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T H E A U S T I N C H R O N I C L E
JULY 25, 2014
a u s t
i n c h r o n
i c
l e
. c om
Belmont, Tuesday 29
Austin’s My Jerusalem and the Boxing Lesson open
music
Listings
july 25-31
soundcheck
by Raoul HeRnandez
in-stores:
Friday:
Vorcha
,
Ex-Cousins
,
the
Blistering Speeds
, Trailer Space, 7pm;
Ugly Beats
, Antone’s Records, 7:30pm; Saturday:
Ex-Optimists
,
the
Excuses
, Trailer Space, 7pm; Tuesday:
Boris
(drumless drone set), End of an Ear, noon;
Nothing
, Waterloo Records, 5pm;
Wednesday:
Radney Foster
, Waterloo Records, 5pm; Thursday:
Nerve Beats
,
T. Putnam Hill
, Trailer Space, 7pm
OBN III’s
Beerland, Friday 25
Garage punk wunderkind Orville Bateman
Neeley’s titular mob finally fêtes its eight-
week-old
Third Time To Harm
at the group’s
home-base sweat palace. The band’s third
LP finds its namesake leaving the garage
for Blue Öyster Cult territory. Live, the front-
man also now plays guitar, adding riffular
heft to avoid “being a shitty Iggy Pop.” Meet
Your Death, a new group featuring one-man
band John Schooley and harp demon Walter
Daniels, debuts. Church Shoes’ raw pop
craftsmanship supports, as does Borzoi’s
scuzzy feedback storms.
Tim Stegall
JustIN sherBurN &
MONtOpOlIs/AtAsh
North Door, Friday 25/Saturday 26
Throwing back to the days when live
accompaniment constituted the emotional
heartbeat of cinema, two Austin acts perform
their scores to silent films, both acts cel-
ebrating album releases. On Friday, Okkervil
River keyboardist Justin Sherburn and his
band Montopolis perform his original work for
seminal 1929 Russian groundbreaker
Man
With a Movie Camera
, which set the standard
for shaky cam way before
The Blair Witch
Project
. Saturday, world music troupe Atash
promotes its fabulous new disc,
Everything
Is Music,
during the 18th annual Austin
Chamber Music Festival, enchanting
The
Unknown
, a Joan Crawford circus horror from
1927 that was lost until the late Sixties.
Nina Hernandez
the COAthANgers
Red 7, Saturday 26
Although this Atlanta alt-punk trio hails
from the Deep South, the unruly rockers
lack the region’s defining social graces. The
former quartet downsized to a keyboardless
trio for their fourth and latest album, March’s
Suck My Shirt
, but their trademark garage grit
and comically crude lyrics remain intact, as
does their rowdy riot grrrl spin on Sixties girl-
group pop. Portland punks White Fang and
likeminded locals Feral Future round out a
triple-threat bill.
Neph Basedow
hArd WOrkINg AMerICANs,
COdy CANAdA
Stubb’s, Saturday 26
A latter day super-group led by lovable
stoner Todd Snider and featuring friends
from Great American Taxi, Chris Robinson
Brotherhood, and always affable Widespread
Panic bassist Dave Schools, Hard Working
Americans take a jam band work ethic and
mix in a singer-songwriter’s lyrical sensibility.
They also cover what they feel are under-
appreciated songs from Randy Newman,
Gillian Welch, and Austin’s own Hayes Carll.
The results are provocative, insightful and, at
times, joyous. Cody Canada kicks up some
red dirt first.
Jim Caligiuri
kINg BuzzO
Red 7, Sunday 27
Only a few heads exploded when Buzz
Osborne, the mop-haired supreme deity of
sludge guitar, announced the release of an
acoustic album early this year. Any concerns
that the distortion-mongering Melvins front-
man was on a campfire folk foray were
put to rest with the June release of
This
Machine Kills Artists
, an unamped Goliath
of downtuned riffage and wizardly bellowing
that holds to his veteran trio’s gold stan-
dard. Expect new tunes, Melvins nuggets,
and an Alice Cooper cover at Red 7, where
Buzzo plays solo after sets by Marriages
vocalist Emma Ruth Rundle and Honky king-
pin Jeff Pinkus.
Kevin Curtin
BOrIs, CereMONy, NOthINg
Mohawk, Tuesday 29
Experimental heavies Boris continue their
ascent into deep space with 19th LP
Noise
,
an expansive trip that phases through the
lurching doom rock, noisy crust blasts, and
artsy drone soundscapes previously racked
by the Japanese trio. Their double-neck-axe-
wielding live show remains a demonstra-
tion of maximum creative intensity in every
titanic note. They arrive to Mohawk in good
company, colliding with a tour featuring
Bay Area hardcore evolutionists Ceremony,
whose charismatic frontman resembles a
Bruce Campbell/Jello Biafra amalgam, and
Philadelphia’s 130-decibel-pushing shoegaz-
ers Nothing.
Kevin Curtin
edited by Raoul HeRnandez
“I’mhearing those scales all
the time.”
PeterMurphy
So notes Peter Murphy of the distinctly Middle Eastern
melodic sense informing his bold new disc,
Lion
. Considering
he lives and raises a family in Turkey, homeland of wife Beyhan,
it’s probably difficult for the Bauhaus singer to escape the influ-
ence. It’s a good thing he considers it “a very perfect sound.”
“It’s almost absorbed, really,” he says over the phone
from Los Angeles.
Murphy explains that
Lion
was birthed last year during his
Bauhaus:35 jaunt, on which the singer undertook performing
nuggets like “Bela Lugosi’s Dead” with his own touring band
rather than reuniting again with the men considered goth’s
fathers. Incidentally, he bristles at being described as “goth.”
“I worked [on
Lion
] with the producer Youth, in England.
He’s in Killing Joke and an old friend. We did it in two very
quick sessions – the only recordings I did – so it was like
being pushed off the elevator. And it worked out well. It’s a
very powerful album, I think.”
Murphy retrofit lyrics and melodies to the producer’s back-
ings in the studio. That left him and his band in the unusual
position of having to learn
Lion
for this current tour, since
only violinist Emilio DiZefalo-China recorded with him.
“There’s a lot of density, orchestration, and stuff,” acknowl-
edges the 57-year-old frontman. “I only have a fourpiece [band],
so we have to make that work with ... electronic help, backing
tracks. But not so many. We’ve got about six of the songs worked
up well. Then it’s all down to making a set that works and flows
for the audiences. Of course, I’ll include my own solo work and
a couple of Bauhaus songs here and there.”
Tim Stegall
live music venues p.66 • roadshows & club listings p.68
earache!
Unexpurgated Tori Amos at
austinchronicle.com/earache
.
JaSON ROBERTS BaNd,
Ray BENSON & MilkdRiVE
Bullock Texas State History Museum,
Friday 25
Music Under the Star series,
6-9pm, crosses the finish line Asleep
at the Wheel.
SUMMER SlaUgHTER TOUR
Scoot Inn, Saturday 26
Ear-bleeding all-stars: Dying Fetus,
Morbid Angel, Goatwhore, Origin, etc.
ROgE
Flamingo Cantina, Saturday 26
Brazilian samba star refutes Jack
Johnson comparisons.
iRON & WiNE
Paramount Theatre, Saturday 26
Nosebleeds remain for Sam Beam’s
5th annual midwives benefit.
HayES CaRll
The Roost, Saturday 26
Western wiseacre’s fifth LP due
through Nashville’s Thirty Tigers.
JON dEE gRaHaM
& Will JOHNSON
Continental Club Gallery, Sunday 27
True Believer and Centro-matic
frontman get intimate upstairs.
STEVE MaRTiN & THE STEEP
CaNyON RaNgERS FT. EdiE
BRiCkEll
Long Center, Tuesday 29
Sold out.
STEVE POlTz
Strange Brew,
Tuesday 29 & Wednesday 30
Canadian Rugburn consecutively.
guitar shorty
Tori Amos
our “Cornflake Girl,” who turned 50 last August and released
her 14th studio album,
Unrepentant Geraldines
, in March. That’s
given way to Tori Amos’ ambitious, one-woman worldwide tour.
“Well, 49 was not good, first off,” reflects the singer from
a stop in San Francisco. “These songs were the songs that
walked me through that bridge, or over it and into a different
place. Now I’m looking at the next 50 years of my life.”
She admonished the pop industry for the manner in which
it treats women of a certain age, while also taking it head on.
“In the pop world, record labels tell you that they have more
men over 50 and up than they do women over 50 because
there isn’t a big demand for it. I said, ‘Well, that sucks.’”
Just as she became a cornerstone of
Unrepentant
Geraldines
with a powerful duet on “Promises,” Amos’
13-year old daughter Natashya (“Tash”) provided the push to
send her mother back on the road.
“My daughter was instrumental in [the tour],” recounts the
singer. “She was like, ‘Look, what you’re saying is that you’re
defeated by this. You have to go compete with your 28-year-
old self. You’re not 84. You’re not a grandma.’
“In the music business it’s very much about younger suc-
cess. Or men. You know, there’s pot bellies and beards and
gray hair and all that, but as I get older as a woman I have
to find ways to tell those stories and play those songs. You
don’t get cast in a movie. It’s not as if you’re going to see a
Helen Mirren movie.”
Abby Johnston
Milestone would be the only
way to describe the past year of
Long Center, Wednesday 30
trevor Moss & Hannah-Lou open